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Author: Doan Winkel

A Real Life Train Wreck

A Real Life Train Wreck

 

EMMA:

I was extremely nervous going into a class which had not fully been developed and also to teach a class that had so many new components that I was learning day by day.

I felt a lot of anxiety, given that I am pre-tenure in my new position, and student feedback is very important to this process.  From my experience, students can sense fear and lack of preparation and use this as a weapon!!

However, I have taken one class at a time, one new element at a time and really enjoyed exploring the new materials. Instead of trying to make the shoe fit the ugly sister, I have modified elements to fit my class and their needs and have very much enjoyed the process so far.  More than anything, I have enjoyed the fact that we have spend 4-5 weeks exploring the issue of problem solving in multiple ways.

In previous classes, students have been convinced that they had the right solution to a problem by week 2 and no matter what research they found, they wouldn’t pivot appropriately given the new evidence.

However, I am still enjoying saying to them “that is a solution… tell me the problem” and “let the research shape your offering, not your own opinion”. That approach is so much harder for the students as they have less control over the outcomes, but so much more rewarding.

 

EMMANUEL:

So far the program has worked well. I believe the initial weeks were great to engage the students and to keep them motivated. Since there are some tweaks still needed it made a little harder to make the students focus on the experience of the course more than the experience with the materials. I think there is too many lessons on interviewing, although I see its utility. I’m excited to test the 60 minute MVP. Hopefully this will engage students more and take them to next level. The only thing I’m not sure about is the pricing. We are making all in our power to bring lower cost materials to our students and $99 is a little steep when in comparison with other full fledged textbook or publisher combos that could be accessible for $35 or less.

 

THOMAS:

I dread preparing for this class. I know this material already, so it shouldn’t be hard, but it is. There are usually 10 tabs open in my browser to see the assignments, the outlines, the links and attachments. I start out clear, then get confused. I like to think I’m not stupid, but working through this to get it ready for my students makes me question that. I may be the only one with this problem, but here are a few specific examples of issues I have had in the past couple weeks.
1. When I try to save a document it ends up in another gmail account. This is certainly my fault, but it is inconvenient. I’m not sure Google Docs is the way to go.
2. I’m put on mailing lists when I access tools, even ones you all created. This may also be my fault, but I don’t need updates from Unbounce, and I certainly don’t need emails from Customer Dev Labs.
3. I did the Mechanical Turk exercise and some of my students are using it as well. But I almost didn’t, not because I’m afraid to talk to people, but because I was afraid I’d open myself up to a whole new spam list.
I don’t know how to solve this for sure. I have thought of spending a weekend and downloading everything and going through it but then when you make changes I won’t see them. I don’t know. Sorry if this letter sounds like I’m venting. I’m only sending it because you asked. The content is really good. Much of it is similar to what I’ve been doing, but I’m learning new stuff as well. It’s just the interaction with the material that is frustrating.

 

OUR RESPONSE TO THOMAS:

Justin and I have received and processed your feedback. Thank you, very much, for your honesty and transparency. This feedback is immensely valuable. These are all great points and things that we not only should, but will, fix.

We’re not exactly sure how yet, but please know these have all made it to the list of improvements for next semester, plus we’ll be exploring if there’s anything we can do to improve the experience in the meantime.
It’s also worth mentioning, none of these issues are your fault. We will find a better way.
Thanks again Thomas. You’ve helped us prioritize this work. Any other feedback you have will be equally welcomed.

Full Class Engagement

If you want to start your class with a bang of energy and active learning, give the Marshmallow Challenge a shot.

Justin and I both love it. We think you, and your students, will will too 🙂

Complete details, including all the instructions for you, are in the lesson plan below.

Get the “Why Business Plans Fail” Lesson Plan

We’ve created a detailed lesson plan for the Marshmallow Challenge exercise to walk you, and your students through the process, step-by-step.

Get the Lesson Plan

 

It’s free for any/all entrepreneurship teachers. Please feel free to share it.

All we ask is that you leave us some feedback on it in the comments below so we can improve it!


What’s Next?

In an upcoming post, we will take you on a tour of our Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum so you can see behind the curtain and determine if it’s something you want to offer your students in the Spring semester.

Subscribe here to get our next classroom resource in your inbox.

Get new lesson plans via email.
Why Business Plans Fail

Why Business Plans Fail

What if you kicked off your next semester with a flurry of activity that showed your students how to avoid the biggest mistake in entrepreneurship – by letting them experience it?

Imagine turning your students’ love for competition into an active learning opportunity about entrepreneurship that your students will remember for the rest of their lives!

        

 

The Marshmallow Challenge is an 18-minute chaotic construction competition that teaches entrepreneurship students why

Invalidated assumptions hinder all new initiatives Click To Tweet

and are ultimately the downfall of most new companies. They learn a bias to action, and the power of resilience in the face of a challenge.

Many professors use the Marshmallow Challenge as an ice-breaker, or as a team-building exercise, with great results. But very few use it to teach its most valuable lesson . . .

Hidden Assumptions

Several of your students will fail this challenge – and it will be glorious!

Inevitably, your students will assume the marshmallow they need to place on top of their structure is lighter than it is, and they’ll assume uncooked spaghetti is strong than it is, leading to a pile of broken, edible, dreams.

In this way, your students will get to learn first-hand:

Just like in entrepreneurship, invalidated assumptions lead to failure.

In traditional classes, business students get trained to write a comprehensive business plan – not realizing hidden assumptions will ultimately hinder its success.

With this exercise, they’ll experience the dangers of hidden assumptions so in future classes, they’ll be primed to validate their business model assumptions:

  • Do customers want the product/service they want to create?
  • Will customers will pay for it?
  • Will enough customers will pay it for the business to be successful?
  • What’s the minimum set of features the customers need?
  • Can they actually build the product and solve their customers’ problem?

Students Love It

After completing the exercise, nearly 85% of students reported feeling confident and/or excited.

With those feelings prevalent in our classrooms, we could change lives!

What specifically are students saying about the our version of the Marshmallow Challenge?

“This activity was not what i was expecting and i took away a lot from it. It was very helpful in the fact that it taught me to not overthink everything and to look at a project with no previous assumptions. It made me think like a kindergartener again and that made me excited. I found the results were very interesting.”– Hannah

“The Marshmallow experiment gave me a real life example of why experimenting is much more beneficial than planning things out.“– Morgan

“I felt as though the marshmallow challenge had a clear goal. After the activity, I understood the importance of adapting to problems and the dangers of assumptions.”– Eric

“I feel I will perform better in the future when completing a project because now I know the value of prototyping, also, now I understand the importance of identifying the hidden assumptions which cause many times good ideas to fail.” – Andreina

Powerful Learning

The fast pace, excitement, and ultimate failure many teams experience during this exercise reflect the typical entrepreneurial experience, and demonstrate many of the pitfalls of traditional business plans:

  • Insufficient identification of hidden assumptions (e.g. the marshmallow is much heavier than they realize, the spaghetti is less rigid than they expect, etc.)
  • Developing plans based on those hidden/incorrect assumptions
  • Investing all their resources (e.g. time, tape, etc.) in a single, large, “launch” attempt vs. iterating on many simpler versions

Through this exercise, your students can learn these essentials of entrepreneurship:

  • Assumption identification and assumption validation are critical to creating successful companies
  • Iterations and experimentations are the key to validating their business assumptions

You can bring the Marshmallow Challenge to life in your classroom with a few easy steps:

Check out ExEC and request a free preview. If you decide to use ExEC in your Spring 2018 class, please sign up here, and we’ll provide you a detailed lesson plan, a reflection assignment for your students, music to play during the challenge to get your students pumped, and free Marshmallow Challenge Kits for each of your students.

Full Class Engagement

If you want to start your class with a bang of energy and active learning, give the Marshmallow Challenge a shot.

Justin and I both love it. We think you, and your students, will will too 🙂

Complete details, including all the instructions for you, are in the lesson plan below.

Get the “Why Business Plans Fail” Lesson Plan

We’ve created a detailed lesson plan for the Marshmallow Challenge exercise to walk you, and your students through the process, step-by-step.

Get the Lesson Plan

 

It’s free for any/all entrepreneurship teachers. Please feel free to share it.

All we ask is that you leave us some feedback on it in the comments below so we can improve it!


What’s Next?

In an upcoming post, we will share a “Real Life Train Wreck” perspective into the Fall Pilot Cohort of our Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum. Through faculty and student testimonials, we will share with you what we are learning, and the excitement you could be leading next semester if you were to adopt ExEC!

Subscribe here to get our next classroom resource in your inbox.

Get new lesson plans via email.
Modeling Customer Interviewing w/ a Demo

Modeling Customer Interviewing w/ a Demo

Click play above for the customer interviewing tutorial outlined in this post.

You want your students to “get out of the building” and talk to customers, but that idea can be anxiety producing, for both you, and your students.

They’re anxious because they have to talk to strangers in a way they’ve never had to before, and you’re anxious because you know customer interviewing is the point in the course when students are most likely to check out.

How do you keep your students engaged?

You’re hearing every excuse imaginable from your students about why they haven’t interviewed customers:

  • They don’t want to ask the wrong questions.
  • They aren’t sure who the “right” people are to interview.
  • They just broke up with their girlfriend. Or they have the swine flu. Or both.

Bottom line is your students are terrified about this critical step in the entrepreneurship process. They are afraid of the unknown. When the time comes for them to step outside the classroom and validate their assumptions with actual customers, they are likely to check out.

How do you keep your students engaged?

How do you turn their fear into excitement?

You show them what customer interviewing looks and feels like. You do a live customer interview in class.

Making yourself vulnerable in front of your students will give them the confidence they need to succeed! Click To Tweet

Below, and in our lesson plan, we lead you through the 5 simple steps to conduct a real customer interview call during your class.

Live Customer Interviewing

mTurk is short for Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, which is a marketplace for work that requires human intelligence. What you need for live customer interviewing is a human being who has a problem. The mTurk marketplace is the perfect place to find a stranger who experiences a particular problem.

mTurk Customer Interviewing

Note: Do not stage this interview by having a colleague or friend or business partner call in. It is imperative you create the situation your students are so nervous about – interviewing a stranger about a real problem they experience.

You need to feel a little nervous about this process, and share those feelings with  your students so they know it is normal to feel that way. You are the role model;

If you want your students to engage, you need to show them how Click To Tweet

Class 1: Create a HIT on mTurk

A HIT is short for a human intelligence task. Create a new HIT here. In this example, we want to talk to parents who have children in day care.

Customer interviewing through mTurk

Step 1: Describe the HIT

Here you want to provide enough details so the people looking for tasks on mTurk can decide if they fit the criteria.

Keywords are an important way for people to find your HIT.

Describe the HIT

Super Important:

You must turn off “Master Turkers.” Master Turkers are a pre-screened, and very small, subset of the MTurk population. You want any folks on MTurk to be able to contact you, as long as they meet your qualifications. Here’s how to do that:

Step 2: Pick a Price

We recommend you offer between $.50 and $2.00 so it is attractive (but not too attractive!) to workers.

Pick a price

Step 3: Write up the HIT

Provide quick, clear criteria and instructions for the workers looking for tasks to connect with you for an interview. Include the date and time when you would like them to call you during your next class session.

Write up the HIT

Feel free to copy and paste (and customize) this HTML for writing up the HIT:

<p><span style=”font-family: Arial;”>If you are a parent who picks your kids at day care at least once/week, please call us for a 5-10 minute phone survey.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: Arial;”>Please dial the following number:</span></p>
<ul>
<li><span style=”font-family: Arial;”>*67&nbsp; [your google voice number]</span></li>
</ul>
<p><span style=”font-family: Arial;”>Note: dialing *67 before the actual phone number will protect the privacy of your phone number. &nbsp;</span><span style=”font-family: Arial;”>If you reach voicemail again, please wait 10 minutes.</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: Arial;”>&nbsp;<b>Required after Calling</b>&nbsp;- after we finish the survey, we will give you a password to confirm you successfully completed it. Please enter it below:</span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: Arial;”><b>Password:</b>&nbsp;<textarea rows=”1″ cols=”80″ name=”answer”></textarea></span></p>
<p><span style=”font-family: Arial;”>Thank you very much! &nbsp;We really appreciate your help! &nbsp;</span></p>

Note: the “password” is a word you tell your interviewee to type in once the interview is complete.  You’ll see what they type in before you approve the HIT (i.e. pay them) so you can ensure only the people who successfully completed the interview get paid.

Step 4: Create a New Batch

Step 5: Publish the HITs


Class 2: The Call

Remind your students of the context of your call so they understand what problem you’re trying to solve, and who the customer is you’ll be talking to. After your call, debrief the call by asking your students to critique it.

What went right? What went wrong? Why did it go wrong?

How could you have kept the person on track?

What were some stronger questions to ask? What questions should you not have asked?

Customer Interviewing Homework

Give your students homework of critiquing another real customer interview. The more real interviews they see and hear, the more comfortable they are conducting them, the more engaged they are in your class. Here is a sample interview you can use for a homework assignment.

Get the Lesson Plan

We’ve created an experiential, 45-minute, Modeling Customer Interviewing Lesson Plan to help you excite your students about customer interviewing! It encapsulates everything we’ve talked about above.

Get the lesson plan

It’s free for any/all entrepreneurship teachers. Please feel free to share it.

All we ask is that you leave us some feedback on it the comments below so we can improve it!


What’s Next?

In a future article, we will provide a checklist for you to plan an experiential entrepreneurship class! Please subscribe here to get that post in your inbox.

Get new lesson plans via email.
Problem Validation: The One Topic You Must Teach

Problem Validation: The One Topic You Must Teach

You’re preparing for fall classes, staring at your syllabus, worrying:

  • Should I teach prototyping or legal formation?
  • Where do I fit in startup marketing?
  • What about IP law or valuation?!

A 16 week semester is far too short to teach everything we want in our entrepreneurship classes. This article will help you prioritize what to teach, because there’s one topic that matters more than any other:

Problem validation is the most important topic to teach in entrepreneurship. Click To Tweet

Problem validation is critically important; everything else in entrepreneurship flows from it. You can’t overlook it when prioritizing your schedule.

Why Problem Validation?

There are 3 reasons you must teach problem validation in your introduction to entrepreneurship, capstone, and your graduate entrepreneurship courses:

  1. It’s the most important aspect of entrepreneurship.

    Customers don’t buy products, they buy solutions to problems. Your students can’t figure out what customers will buy unless they validate problems.

    entrepreneurship, teaching, problem, solution, idea
    Once your students understand how to validate problems, they’ll quickly see how the rest of a business model falls into place.
    Every aspect of business models flow from problem validation, so it’s imperative we teach our students how to do it well.
  2. Problem validation cannot be read. It must be practiced.
    If they have to, students can learn other topics like valuation, IP law, legal formation, and marketing outside the classroom. There are endless blogs and videos that cover the basics of every topic in entrepreneurship…except problem validation.
    Students cannot learn how to talk to customers by reading about it. Your students have to experience asking the right customers, the right questions.

    Students learn problem validation, by doing problem validation. Click To Tweet

  3. You’re their only teacher.
    No one else in your students’ academic career will touch the subject of problem validation.
    Your accounting and finance colleagues can help them with revenue modeling. Engineering professors can help them with product development. Your business law colleagues can help them with legal formation and IP issues.

    But problem validation, this thing that is so important to entrepreneurship, will only be covered by you.

    If you have to cut something from your schedule, cut anything but problem validation. Make sure you’re teaching this because nobody else is, and because it is the most important aspect of entrepreneurship!

    No one will teach problem validation, except you. Click To Tweet

Workshop: How to Teach Problem Validation

It’s critical we don’t just talk about problem validation. We must teach our students how to do it, and to do it the right way.

(Note: surveys are not the right way 🙂 )

If you want help with that, we’re hosting our first free, 1-hour, online workshop on June 22nd, 2017. We’ll talk about the three phases of problem validation:

  1. Problem hypothesis
  2. Problem discovery
  3. Problem confirmation

We will teach you these three phases, and we’ll show you engaging exercises you can run in your class to teach them.

Teaching Problem Validation teaches business model validation

Join us if you want to learn how to teach this subject that every entrepreneurship teacher needs to teach, and teach well!

We will send a video recording of the workshop to anyone who registers, but you don’t want the video. You want to show up live, because it will be an interactive workshop. To see and experience the exercises, you’ll want to be present.


What’s Next?

We will be sharing more exercises to teach customer interviewing soon! Please subscribe here to get that post in your inbox.

Get new lesson plans via email.
Experiential Curriculum Launch

Experiential Curriculum Launch

We all struggle teaching idea generation, problem validation and customer interviewing in a way that fully engages our students.

Not only are we competing for our students’ attention, our methods for teaching business model validation are uninspired – especially when many of our students don’t want to be entrepreneurs.

Building an Experiential Curriculum

So what can our 1,100-strong community of teachers do about it?

Build our own experiential curriculum.

We need a curriculum that motivates our students to learn skills like:

  1. Quality idea generation
  2. Customer interviewing
  3. Problem validation

With immersive exercises, experience labs, and relevant case studies our students connect with.

We’ve drafted the ideal curriculum and a comprehensive resource guide we’d like to see for our community. Now the question is, should we build it?

We invite you to preview our Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum and let us know if you would use it in your classroom, and if not, why not.

We are practicing what we preach, validating demand for a solution to our struggle of teaching idea generation, problem validation and customer interviewing in a way that fully engages our students.

Teaching Failure Through Currency Testing

Teaching Failure Through Currency Testing

Learning from failure is one of the most important skills our entrepreneurial students need to learn. It’s also one of the most difficult to teach.

We can talk all day about running experiments and testing assumptions, but ultimately they’re a waste of time if our students can’t successfully extract learning from failed experiments and invalidated hypotheses.

The trick to teaching failure is that our students have grown up in an environment where they are taught to avoid failure at all costs. They are taught to fear failure.

In fact, many of your students’ previous teachers leveraged a fear of failure to compel your students to behave a certain way: do busy-work, memorize lists, etc.

In entrepreneurship education, we need to change the perception of failure. Click To Tweet

As entrepreneurship educators, we need to create safe places for our students to engage with failures, so they can practice extracting knowledge from them.

As our students develop their failure analysis skills, they will:

  • Fear failure less – they will realize on a personal level that they can learn more from failure than from success.
  • Increase their confidence – entrepreneurship is less scary when you know even if one experiment fails, you’ll succeed in creating the foundation for the next.
  • Take calculated risks – which are prerequisites to thriving in an innovation economy.

Failure Always Invite Learning

Fast Forward Their First Failure

The Currency Testing lesson plan below will guide you through creating a constructive experience for your students to learn from their first entrepreneurship failure.

In our last exercise, your students launched an MVP, without a line of code. (If you haven’t read that exercise, you’ll want to now. Not only is it a blast, you’ll need to know it for this Currency Testing exercise).

Once they’ve learned that they too can launch a product, you’re ready to show them…

Launching the product is easy. It’s selling the product that’s hard.

In fact, it’s so hard, your students will likely fail their first time around, just like most entrepreneurs, which is the point of this exercise.

By fast-forwarding their first failure, you’re going to turn your students from first-time founders, into “serial entrepreneurs” 🙂 After satiating their drive to “build something” your students will realize…

The only thing more fun than building something, is building something people want. Click To Tweet

As your students begin to focus less on what they want to build, and more on what other people want to buy, they’ll be eager for you to teach them problem validation.

The Currency Test

At the heart of this exercise is something called a “Currency Test.” A currency test is simply an experiment where entrepreneurs test if customers are willing to pay some form of currency (e.g. cash, attention, data, etc.) in exchange for a product.

A currency test is a much more powerful experiment than asking customers, “Would you use this?” or “How much would you pay for this?” because it’s forces them to put their money where their mouth is. Where it’s easy for a customer to say, “I’d definitely use that” to a hypothetical product, entrepreneurs will learn how customers really feel, when they’re asked to break out their wallets.

Best of all, the results of a currency test are always helpful.Either the test succeeds and the entrepreneur validates demand for their product, or it fails and the entrepreneur gets to ask what’s preventing their customers from buying, so they can improve their next iteration.

Your students will conduct their currency test using the MVPs they built.

When they struggle to get currency (which they will, because like most first-time entrepreneurs their MVPs were more product-focused than customer- and problem-focused), their experiment will fail. They’ll be wondering why they couldn’t find customers for a product they thought was such a good idea, and at this point they’re primed.

Having experienced their first entrepreneurial failure, they’re now ready to hear:

  1. Why being problem-focused is essential in entrepreneurship.
  2. Why talking to customers before building is the key to success.
  3. The value of identifying marketing channels.
  4. How important marketing copy is.

And most importantly, they’ll learn from personal experience…

We learn more from our failures than we do our successes. Click To Tweet

The Failure Postmortem

After their failures, the lesson plan will show you how to walk your students through the most powerful part of this exercise: “The Currency Test Postmortem.”

In the postmortem, students answer questions related to what they learned about their customers and problems, and about marketing and selling their product. They’ll also begin to see first-hand the value of problem validation and testing their business model assumptions.

The postmortem also will model an approach to analyzing failures they can use in your class, as well as throughout their careers to overcome failures they and their products, teams, and companies will encounter in the future.

Increase their Grit

If you want to change your students’ relationship toward failure, if you want to instill in them the skills they need to not just recover from failure, but thrive because of it, give the Currency Test Lesson Plan a shot.

And remember the entrepreneurship proverb…

Teach a student how to fish; she’ll eat for a lifetime. Teach a student how to fail; she’ll innovate global food distribution... providing sustainable food sources for half the world’s population at a fraction of the cost while employing thousands of previously unemployed and under-employed. You should do this one.

😉

Get the Lesson Plan

We’ve created an experiential, 45-minute, Teaching Failure Lesson Plan to help you prepare your students to learn from failure. It encapsulates everything we’ve talked about above plus a few surprises!

Get the lesson plan


It’s free for any/all entrepreneurship teachers. Please feel free to share it.

All we ask is that you leave us some feedback on it the comments below so we can improve it!


What’s Next?

In a future article, we will provide a checklist for you to plan an experiential entrepreneurship class! Please subscribe here to get that post in your inbox.

Get new lesson plans via email.
Exercise: 60 Minute MVP

Exercise: 60 Minute MVP

Imagine looking out at your classroom, and every student is talking and typing furiously. It’s noisy. Students are learning together and teaching each other.

There’s a buzz of nervousness and excitement!

Exercise: Students launch landing pages in < 60 Minutes

This is by far, one of Justin and my favorite in-class experiences because “60 Minute MVP” is engaging, fun, and fully-immersive, while teaching critical aspects of the entrepreneurial mindset.

Your students are going to build, and launch, an MVP in 60 minutes…with no technical expertise!

If fact, during this hour, your students will build…

A Landing Page

A simple website that describes the problem they’re solving to the customers they want to serve.

Your students will create landing pages like this

An Explainer Video

A quick video that hints how their solution will solve the problem.

And a Currency Test…

…to validate demand for their product!

Your students will learn how to use a service called Celery to take pre-orders for their products to demonstrate real demand, without them actually having to charge money/store credit card information/etc.

For example:

currency testing sample

And they’ll do it all, in an hour.

What are Landing Page MVPs?

Over the course of an hour, your students will create a landing page (a simple, single-page website) that:

  1. Tells their customers the problem their team is solving,
  2. Uses a video to demonstrate how, the team will solve the problem and
  3. Asks for some form of “currency” from their customers to validate demand.

You can incorporate this exercise into one class period in your syllabus; push your students to complete every step within an hour. They can tweak things later, the important thing is that they don’t spend a ton of time trying to get everything perfect the first time around. As they will find later on, doing that for every experiment wastes a lot of time.

It’s important to note, for this exercise:

They’ll Learn More in 60 Minutes

…than they will in 6 hours of lectures:

  1. The true meaning of MVP. They will learn exactly how “minimum” a minimum viable product should be. MVP doesn’t mean “beta” – it means making least amount of investment possible, to test a business model’s riskiest assumption.
  2. How much they can accomplish when they work as a team. By dividing and conquering, your students will be astounded at how much they can collectively accomplish in one hour.
  3. How many great, free tools exist for entrepreneurs. The internet is a crowded place, so we want to show them that there are free tools out there to help them develop skills they don’t yet possess.
  4. The upside of deadlines. Our students don’t usually work under tight deadlines, but they will soon! We want to show them how tight deadlines push them to get everything done, and give them a positive experience executing under tight deadlines.
  5. It is easier to launch a product than they thought. Most of our students are overwhelmed at the idea of launching a product, because their assumptions are wrong. We want to correct those assumptions so they believe in their ability to launch.
  6. That the easiest thing about building a business is launching the product. In a future post, we will explain that the most difficult part of launching is actually the testing and validation. Getting something into the world is quite easy, which your students will understand after this experience.

Most importantly, they will learn…

When it comes to MVPs, done is better than perfect.

Your Job in the Class

You have an important role during this exercise. While we’ve documented all of the instructions your students need to follow (see the lesson plan for details), you’ll need to be the chief cheerleader, time-keeper and discussion leader.

Here’s what that entails:

  1. Give your students the instructional videos. We’ve recorded step-by-step videos for your student teams to follow when creating their MVPs. Links to the videos and instructions are provided in the lesson plan below.
  2. Play music. Ask them what music gets them pumped, and then play that. Create an energetic, intense, exciting environment for the students.
  3. Keep shouting how little time they have left. Create a sense of urgency; don’t write time on the board. Don’t announce it in your normal tone. Shout it, wave your hands; stress how important it is that something get launched, even if it’s not the perfect something. It is likely your students will want to focus on minor technical or design details. Because the goal is to execute in 60 minutes, you need to refocus your students on that goal and steer them away from their inclination toward perfection. Remind them that:

“Done is better than perfect.”

  1. Celebrate the hell out of each MVP as it launches. Show each team’s MVP on the screen, and congratulate them on the incredible things they accomplished in 60 minutes.
  2. Host a discussion with your students about what it was like to build an MVP in 60 minutes. You’ll find your students reflect most, if not all, of the learning objectives listed above.

Note: when they step out of their comfort zone, they’ll get the most out of this exercise.

Full Class Engagement

If you’re looking for an immersive exercise that activates your class, complete with a chaotic, noisy, high pressure environment, that teaches real entrepreneurial principles, give “60 Minute MVP” a shot.

Justin and I both love it. We think you, and your students, will will too 🙂

Complete details, including all the instructions for you, and videos for your students are in the lesson plan below.

Get the “60 Minute MVP” Lesson Plan

We’ve created a detailed lesson plan for the “60 Minute MVP” exercise walk you, and your students through the process, step-by-step.

Get the Lesson Plan

 

It’s free for any/all entrepreneurship teachers. Please feel free to share it.

All we ask is that you leave us some feedback on it in the comments below so we can improve it!


What’s Next?

In an upcoming post, we will share a companion exercise to the “60 Minute MVP” exercise. This will help students understand why it is critical to engage customers prior to launching!

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