1 Week Left to Adopt ExEC

1 Week Left to Adopt ExEC

Fall is just around the corner!

Adopt ExEC today and let us set you up for success by delivering detailed lesson plans and a simplified grading process, and enabling you to deliver award-winning experiential exercises that transform your classroom into a hive of activity from day one.

Engage Your Students This Fall

We’ve been busy updating our curriculum to adapt to your learning environment:

Sample ExEC Syllabus

We’ve got you covered whether you’ll be in-person, online synchronous or asynchronous, or some hybrid model.

ExEC is an engaging and structured curriculum that’s flexible enough for your Fall. To fully engage your students this Fall, request a full preview of ExEC today!

Preview ExEC Now

2 Weeks Til Fall: Plan Today

2 Weeks Til Fall: Plan Today

Fall will be here before you know it!

Adopt ExEC today and let us set you up for success by delivering detailed lesson plans and a simplified grading process, and enabling you to deliver award-winning experiential exercises that engage your students from day one.

Be Prepared This Fall

To help with your Fall prep, we’ve been busy updating our curriculum to adapt to just about any learning environment:

Sample ExEC Syllabus

Whether you will teach:

  • In-person
  • Online synchronous
  • Online asynchronous
  • Hybrid

ExEC will help you design an engaging and structured course, that’s flexible enough for this Fall. For more details on using ExEC this Fall, request a full preview today!

Preview ExEC Now

How to Teach The Business Model Canvas

How to Teach The Business Model Canvas

Alex Osterwalder Teaching Business Model Canvas Workshop August 3rd

Join us Aug. 3rd to learn how to…

Teach the Business Model Canvas (BMC) from the creator himself, Dr. Alex Osterwalder!

TeachingEntrepreneurship.org and Alex are hosting a free workshop on how to use his industry re-defining tools: Business Model Canvas, Value Proposition Canvas, etc.

Join us to get exercises to engage students in :

  1. Business model thinking &
  2. Testing business ideas

The session will start with Osterwalder walking you through a number of Business Model Canvas exercises of varying difficulty and engagement. Then he’ll introduce exercises to teach the mechanics of experimentation.

Register Here

**NOTE: We will record the session for anyone who cannot make it, so please register even if you can’t attend so you will have access to the recording**

For more on Osterwalder, check out his company Strategyzer and his suite of books being used in entrepreneurship classrooms around the world.

Try ExEC this Fall

Try ExEC this Fall

Compared to last year…

Fall represents a breath of fresh air.

Here are some tips to make the most of it!

#1 Students are Eager to Engage

After a year of isolation and online learning, students are craving interaction.

Students don’t want lectures – they want experiences.

Your students are already be primed to engage. To take advantage, replace your lectures with interactive experiences.

Whether you compile your own exercise or use a cohesive toolset like the Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum (ExEC) you can tap into your students’ excitement using structured activities to build their entrepreneurial skills. For example:

Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum Testimonial

Whether your class is:

  • 8 weeks or 15 weeks
  • Online or in-person
  • Undergraduate or graduate

ExEC’s award-winning exercises can help you engage your students this fall.

Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum Logo

#2 Structure + Consistency

When everything turned upside down last year, it became clear how much structure and consistency help students learn and decrease anxiety. As you look toward fall, consider…

How can you create more structure and consistency to facilitate better outcomes?

Whether it’s through:

  • A cohesive set of topics
  • Well-organized schedule
  • Objective rubrics
  • or LMS integration

Students benefit from having a consistent, structured environment to develop their skills.

To that end, ExEC is fully experiential and extremely well-organized:

Semester Experiential entrepreneurship education schedule

Plus with ExEC’s LMS integration, prepping for your class is easy. With a couple clicks, you upload yourr entire class into your LMS so you have time to dive into the detailed lesson plans.

ExEC Integrates with all LMS

#3 Experiment

Teach your students what real-world experiments look like by modeling them in your class:

  1. Identify something you’d like to improve in your class (e.g. engagement, quality of student ideas, financial modeling acumen, etc.).
  2. Select a metric to assess the element you’d like to improve (e.g. number of students participating in discussions, number of ideas that are needs-based, realism of financial models, etc.).
  3. Let your students know you treat your class like a business – you consistently run experiments to optimize the experience for your customers (i.e. the students).
  4. Change something in your course to move your metric (e.g. try a different curriculum, implement a new exercise, etc.).
  5. Compare the results to a previous class (i.e. did your metric improve?).
  6. Share the results with your students (i.e. let them know what you were trying to improve, what changes you make, and how they impacted the class).

Modeling real-world experiments to your students will encourage them to run their own experiments, and improve the learning experience for students and the quality of their outcomes!

Give Your Students Engagement, Quality, and Structure

ExEC is an award-winning, peer-reviewed, experiential curriculum that engages students in building entrepreneurial skills.

Try ExEC this Fall.

Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum Logo


What’s Next?

In upcoming posts, we will share more engaging resources we are developing for entrepreneurship educators to transform their classrooms!

Subscribe here to be the first to get these resources delivered to your inbox!

Join 13,000+ instructors. Get new exercises via email!

Workshop: Teaching the Business Model Canvas with Alex Osterwalder

Workshop: Teaching the Business Model Canvas with Alex Osterwalder

Alex Osterwalder Teaching Business Model Canvas Workshop August 3rd

Join us Aug. 3rd to learn how to…

Teach the Business Model Canvas (BMC) from the creator himself, Dr. Alex Osterwalder!

TeachingEntrepreneurship.org and Alex are hosting a free workshop on how to use his industry re-defining tools: Business Model Canvas, Value Proposition Canvas, etc.

Join us to get exercises to engage students in :

  1. Business model thinking &
  2. Testing business ideas

The session will start with Osterwalder walking you through a number of Business Model Canvas exercises of varying difficulty and engagement. Then he’ll introduce exercises to teach the mechanics of experimentation.

Register Here

For more on Osterwalder, check out his company Strategyzer and his suite of books being used in entrepreneurship classrooms around the world.

Improve Your Student Evaluations

Improve Your Student Evaluations

Student evaluations are a mixed blessing but there are specific steps you can take to improve them:

  1. Conduct a midterm evaluation
  2. Solicit frequent feedback
  3. Make entrepreneurship relevant
  4. Sweeten the pot
  5. Engage, engage, engage

Midterm Chat

Asking students for feedback during the course allows them to have ownership of their experience, and allows you to make suggested changes, which generally leads to more positive evaluations at the end of the course!

Ask a colleague to run this class session while you stay out of the room – preferably a colleague not in your department so students feel more comfortable being transparent. Your colleague informs students all information is anonymous and confidential, and that only information that is unanimous will be communicated to you. Students discuss the following questions one by one:

  • What is going well this semester?
  • What isn’t going well this semester?
  • What can the students do to improve their [the students’] experience?
  • What can the instructor do to improve their [the students’] experience?

Your colleague summarizes the feedback for you, either verbally or written, including only the suggestions that students unanimously agree upon.

During the next class session, it is critical to discuss what you learned and how you will adjust the course based on the feedback.

The whole experience takes just 15 – 30 minutes and it demonstrates to students that their voice matters (like customers’ voices matter). The combination of you taking action on students’ recommendations, that your students will feel heard, and that they will likely never have experienced something like in another one of their classes makes this approach a reliable way to improve your evaluations.

Frequent Feedback

You can also seek feedback from students more frequently than mid-semester. Every few weeks, incorporate a quick evaluation to take students’ pulse. Assign a five-question evaluation assignment in your LMS, or hand out and collect in class to anonymize it:

  • What is one takeaway you remember from the course so far?
  • How do you feel about your participation in [name an activity, or “discussion”] this week?
  • What works best for you in class?
  • Is there a change that would enhance your learning?
  • Do you have any questions or comments for me?

Use this as a quick temperature check for your students’ experience.

And be willing to adjust!

Look for trends in what’s working and what’s not. Can you incorporate any of their suggestions? Can you redirect the next class session based on the changes they suggest?

During the next class session, share a summarized version of the themes you heard. Quickly explain how you will address suggestions, and ask students to respond to that plan. As with the midterm check-in, this exercise offers students ownership and a voice, which will improve your evaluations at the end of the course. But only if you communicate openly and do not become defensive.

Make Entrepreneurship Relevant

What do you do with the entrepreneurship students who don’t want to be entrepreneurs?

Whether they’re taking your class because it fit in their schedule, someone said it was an “easy A”, or it’s a required course, we all have students who don’t identify as entrepreneurs. Not only can their personal feedback lower your evaluations, but their lack of engagement can hinder the experience (and as a result the evaluations) of other students.

The best way to engage these students is to…

Make entrepreneurial skills relevant, regardless of career path.

Kim Pichot had one of these students. A disillusioned senior so checked out of school that at one point he asked her, “What can I do to graduate? I just need out of here.”

Luckily, that semester Kim had started using the Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum, which starts off with an exercise designed explicitly to engaged this type of student: Fears and Curiosities.

This exercise helps your students express what they are most curious, and fearful, about…which is the recipe you need to make entrepreneurship relevant to all of your students.

  • When students tell you they’re worried about finding a job, you can point out that in this class, they’re going to learn a wide range of marketable skills that employers are actively hiring for: product design, sales, marketing, website development, video editing, social media management, etc.
  • When students say they’re unsure if they’ll be able to make enough money, you can explain to them that the entrepreneurship skills they learn in this class are all about making sure you’ll be able to make enough money to meet your goals. With the finance and budgeting tools they’ll learn in your class, they’ll learn how to both make and manage their money whether they start their own company or not.
  • When students say they’re not even sure what kind of job they’ll be good at, you can make it clear an entrepreneurship class like yours is the perfect place to experiment with different types of jobs (e.g. sales, marketing, CEO, finance, prototyping, etc.).

The great thing about this approach is that entrepreneurial skills are genuinely relevant whether or not students want to be entrepreneurs.

You just need to make entrepreneurship relevant to your students on a personal and emotional level.

That’s what Kim did in her class. By making entrepreneurship relevant and engaging, and with a little help from ExEC, Kim’s disillusioned student left her course ecstatic, saying:

Improve student evaluations

Sweeten the Pot

Share a treat with your students. It might be candy, or cookies, or donuts. Celebrate an occasion like a birthday, or one of your students’ sports accomplishment, or just a sunny day! Something sweet puts a smile on most people’s face.

You’re inviting your students to have fun, and when we have fun, we are more likely to remember that experience fondly.

When a group is eating donuts, for instance, you’ll see smiles, you’ll hear laughter and sounds of delight, you’ll find a playful atmosphere. Incorporate fun food into your course, and your students will remember that come evaluation time. Take the time while sharing fun food to also have fun conversation. Ask students questions about their favorite concert, or about their favorite vacation destination, or any variety of questions that lead them to tell humorous stories about fun memories.

One way to incorporate sweets while teaching entrepreneurship skills is an adaptation of the “Retooling Products to Reach New Markets: The Lindt Candy Dilemma” exercise Dr. Kimberly Eddleston at Northeastern University developed. We adapted it slightly to focus more on the customer interviewing opportunity – find the entire lesson here.

Essentially, in this exercise, you task student teams to retool the Lindt Lindor Chocolate Truffle Balls for a new audience – a young person (ideally a family member of yours – someone you can show a picture of and have access to). Students must deliver a 90 second pitch for one product (that is not any sort of M&M type candy) they develop based on the Lindt Lindor chocolate truffle ball that appeals to the target person. Students include the following in their pitch:

  • Product name & tagline/slogan
  • Product concept/description (user experience, packaging, etc.)
  • Value proposition (the benefits the customer should expect)
  • Drawing of the product/packaging

Organize students into groups of 4 or 5 members and give them 30 minutes to develop their new product offering. Students often spend too much time on the idea generation phase. Walk around the room, reminding them of the time left. This creates some urgency for them to move beyond idea generation and complete all aspects of the assignment.

In my courses, students know they are designing a product for my son. I sidestep questions about my son because I want students to realize they have access to the actual customer. If students ask to talk to my son, I call them and let the team talk to them (if they are available). If they are not available, I answer questions on their behalf as honestly as possible.

Teams will design a wide variety of products, some related to their own memories of being that age, some related to brothers’/sisters’ interests, and some related to guesses about what young people are interested in. Record student pitches and show them to your target person, who will select a winner and explain their justification (record this and show it to the class).

This exercise forces students to reimagine an existing product instead of creating a new product. The key learning is about customer interviewing. I recommend using this exercise after students have been practicing interviewing around new ideas/products. This allows you to show them the value of interviewing in a new context, which reiterates this most important skill to entrepreneurs.

Discussion questions to ask students include:

  • What was the most difficult aspect of retooling the product? Why?
  • Did you think about interviewing my son? Why or why not? If you thought about it, and did not interview him, why not?
  • Did you think about asking my son (or I) for feedback on your prototype? Why or why not? If you thought about it, and did not ask him (or me), why not?
  • What lessons did you learn about new product development?

The main points to reiterate during the debrief:

  • If you know your customer segment, interview them! Don’t guess what they want, ask them what they want.
  • Do not get lost in idea generation. Quickly gather feedback on ideas/prototypes from your customer.
  • Customer wants/needs and jobs-to-be-done will differ drastically between target groups.

Engage, Engage, Engage

All of that said…

The #1 way to improve your evaluations is to engage your students.

Our Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum (ExEC) is an engaging experience, for you and your students. Instead of you talking at students, the exercises invite your students to learn by doing, so they engage themselves. For example, your students can…

  • brainstorm their ideal customers, so they understand the emotional needs of people they are attached to (i.e. people they are passionate about helping), which become the foundation of their business ideas, ensuring students are motivated throughout your course,
  • play a competitive game to learn what questions they should and should not ask during customer interviews, then practice their interview skills with their classmates using our robust interview script.

Improve student evaluations with ExEC

ExEC Will Improve Your Evals

Students love to be engaged, but they also appreciate fair, transparent grading with structured rubrics. How you provide students feedback is critical to keeping them engaged, so we built robust and easy-to-use rubrics into ExEC! Using ExEC, you provide meaningful feedback very quickly, so students get the instant feedback they insist upon.

Improve your Evaluations This Fall

Preview ExEC and watch your student evaluations skyrocket next year!

Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum Logo

LMS Integration

ExEC also integrates with major Learning Management Systems to simplify adoption:

ExEC Integrates with all LMS

 

Student engagement with ExEC


What’s Next?

In an upcoming post, we have an exciting announcement about Alexander Osterwalder, one of the gurus of the lean startup movement!

Subscribe here to be the first to grab a “seat” at the Summit.

Join 13,000+ instructors. Get new exercises via email!

Summer 2021 Summit Early Bird Last Call

Summer 2021 Summit Early Bird Last Call

Today is the last day to get $100-off a full access ticket to the Teaching Entrepreneurship Summer Summit!


We know budgets are tight right now, so live access to the workshops is free.

If you’d like the session recordings and slides, or simply can’t attend all of the sessions:

Register today for $100 off the recordings of all 3 workshops.

GET YOUR EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT TODAY!


May 25th 1-3 EST: Making Finance Fun

Summer Summit: Making Finance Fun

Financial projections don’t have to overwhelm students!

Get engaging exercises, including a brand new game, for teaching revenue modeling.


June 2nd 1-3 EST: Better Idea Generation

Summer Summit: Better Idea Generation

Exercises and tips to improve the creativity, feasibility and, impact of student business.

Plus: How (and when) to intervene when students “fall in love” with bad ideas.


GET YOUR EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT TODAY!


June 10th 1-3 EST: Improving Student Pitches

Summer Summit: Improving Student Pitches

New tools for tweaking your pitch day format to…

Move students away from “innovation theater” toward rewarding real entrepreneurial skill development.

Hint: Imagine if entrepreneurial skills were at the Olympics.


Early Bird Tickets Available

We know budgets are tight right now so we’re offering a new “Live Access Only” ticket free of charge.

Plus: Full Access tickets, which include recordings and slides, are $100 off – but the Early Bird sale ends today!

GET YOUR EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT TODAY!


What’s Next?

In upcoming posts, we will share lesson plans and approaches to engage your students from the first to the last day of class!

Subscribe here to be the first to learn about our innovative approach.

Join 13,000+ instructors. Get new exercises via email!

Student Engagement This Fall

Student Engagement This Fall

The biggest challenge this year has been student engagement. How do we flip the script and . . .

How do we engage students in the Fall?

Option 1: Update Your Textbook

The most obvious way to increase the energy of a class is to switch up the textbook. Unfortunately, due to their inherent structure, textbooks don’t often:

  • engage students
  • or teach skills.

Not to mention textbooks are expensive, and for the most part, students don’t even read them.

If your goal is engagement, a new textbook may be an incremental improvement but from our experience, it won’t make a dramatic difference.

Option 2: DIY Experiences

Experiential courses engage students far more than any textbook. If you’ve got the time to build a curriculum with your favorite experiences from around the web, you can create have an interactive class.

That said, classes comprised of ad hoc exercises have downsides especially in terms of:

  • Lack of cohesion / structure
  • Time spent re-inventing the wheel

Fortunately, there’s a way to get the best of both worlds…

Option 3: An Experiential Curriculum

Instead of building your own curriculum, tools like the Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum can offer…

  • Engaging classes with the
  • Structure of a textbook.

student engagement with ExEC

Plus, ExEC offers

LMS Integration

In less than 5 minutes you’ll have your course imported into Canvas, Brightspace/D2L, Blackboard or Moodle.

student engagement in any LMS

Rubrics & Syllabi

ExEC integrated rubrics and starter syllabi make both course prep, and grading faster.

student engagement with rubrics & syllabi

Student Engagement Online, In-Person, or Hybrid

No matter what format your class takes this Fall, ExEC has a set of exercises to engage your students:

  • In-person
  • Online synchronous
  • Online asynchronous
  • All of the above!

8 to 16-Week Schedules

ExEC is flexible enough for any schedule including:

  • Accelerated MBA courses
  • Quarter system courses
  • 12-week Canadian semesters
  • 15-week US semesters

For example…

Student engagement with various schedules

Student Engagement Can Happen This Fall

Preview ExEC and see if it can help you and your students next year!

Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum Logo


What’s Next?

In an upcoming post, we will share information about our upcoming Summer Summit where we will share some exciting new exercises!

Subscribe here to be the first to grab a “seat” at the Summit.

Join 13,000+ instructors. Get new exercises via email!

Reflective Quizzes: A Skill-Building Alternative to Multiple Choice

Reflective Quizzes: A Skill-Building Alternative to Multiple Choice

Quizzes are helpful, especially in large classes, because they’re easy to grade and can motivate some students to do their pre-assigned reading.

The problem with quizzes is they assess “reading and regurgitating” skills more than entrepreneurial skills.

Quizzes also create a cat-and-mouse game where students can share answers online, forcing you to constantly update the quiz questions.

On the other hand, reflection assignments are great at assessing skills and mindset development – they just traditionally take longer to grade.

Reflective Quizzes: Build Skills (with less grading)

We’ve been developing a new type of quiz for our ExEC Big Intro curriculum that:

  1. Is as fast to grade as a normal quiz
  2. Incentivizes students to come to class prepared
  3. Uses open-ended questions and reflective prompts to assess student skills and mindset development

Here’s a demo:

Grading Shouldn’t Be Exhausting

Assessments in experiential courses can be as formative for students as the exercises themselves!

So if assessment is one of your least favorite parts of teaching, there are a couple things that may help:


Want Your Students Building Real Skills?

Request a preview of ExEC Big Intro here.

ExEC Intro logo


What’s Next?

In an upcoming post, we will share information about our upcoming Summer Summit where we will share some exciting new exercises!

Subscribe here to be the first to grab a “seat” at the Summit.

Join 13,000+ instructors. Get new exercises via email!

Summer 2021 Summit Invite

Summer 2021 Summit Invite

The Teaching Entrepreneurship Summit is back!

Now with…

3 New Experiential Exercises

The Teaching Entrepreneurship Summit is your chance to not only get the new lesson but see them in action. Plus, they’re…

Free when you join us live!

All sessions will run from 1 – 3pm Eastern but if you can’t join us live, recordings are available for sale.

REGISTER NOW!


May 25: Making Finance Fun

Summer Summit: Making Finance Fun

Financial projections don’t have to overwhelm students!

Get engaging exercises, including a brand new game, for teaching revenue modeling.

June 2: Better Idea Generation

Summer Summit: Better Idea Generation

Exercises and tips to improve the creativity, feasibility and, impact of student business.

Plus: How (and when) to intervene when students “fall in love” with bad ideas.

June 10: Improving Student Pitches

Summer Summit: Improving Student Pitches

New tools for tweaking your pitch day format to…

Move students away from “innovation theater” toward rewarding real entrepreneurial skill development.

Hint: Imagine if entrepreneurial skills were at the Olympics.

REGISTER NOW!


Early Bird Tickets Available

We know budgets are tight right now so we’re offering a new “Live Access Only” ticket free of charge.

Plus: Full Access tickets, which include recordings and slides, are $100 off before May 11th.

REGISTER NOW!


What’s Next?

In an upcoming post, we will share information about our reflective quiz approach to more effective assessment!

Subscribe here to be the first to learn about this innovative approach.

Join 13,000+ instructors. Get new exercises via email!