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Top 5 Engaging Exercises for Your Entrepreneurship Curriculum

Top 5 Engaging Exercises for Your Entrepreneurship Curriculum

Are you tired of seeing blank stares while you lecture? It’s time to update your entrepreneurship curriculum to invigorate your classroom with exercises that truly engage your students.

Here are our top 5 exercises to include in your entrepreneurship curriculum:

Complete with lesson plans, that have proven to capture students’ interest and drive dynamic learning experiences.

#5 Teaching the Business Canvas Model

Image promoting a Business Model Canvas (BMC) teaching session with Dr. Alex Osterwalder as part of the Entrepreneurship Curriculum. It features a BMC template on the left and Dr. Alex Osterwalder smiling and seated with books on the right, along with text: "Exercises: Teaching the BMC with Dr. Alex Osterwalder".

First up is an exercise based on a workshop we did Dr. Alex Osterwalder, the creator of the Business Canvas Model. This Business Canvas Model teaching exercise is a hit among educators and students alike.

The Business Model Canvas helps students understand and develop business models effectively.

Follow along with the first part of this three-part series to introduce your students to the Business Model Canvas and see their understanding of business concepts deepen.


#4 The Marshmallow Tower Challenge

Five people with emoji faces stand around a table in a classroom. On the table in front of them is a tall, makeshift structure made of yellow straws and blue tape. One person is holding the top of the structure. Everyone appears to be enjoying themselves, showcasing their creativity in an entrepreneurship curriculum activity.

Next, we’ll take a look at a challenge that will engage your students and get them thinking outside the box.

The Marshmallow Tower Challenge is a fun and interactive way to teach the importance of iteration, experimentation, and the value of failure.

This exercise challenges business model assumptions and encourages creative thinking. Plus, as a bonus, you can let your students enjoy any leftover marshmallows—a guaranteed way to get them smiling and engaged!


#3 The Backpack Design Challenge

An image of a "Backpack Design Challenge" worksheet, part of an Entrepreneurship Curriculum. The top half features the title and section 3, prompting users to list three "Must Have" features for their ideal backpack, with examples provided. The bottom left shows two backpack sketches, while a blank space for notes is on the right.

The Backpack Design Challenge is a step-by-step exercise that immerses your students in the entire design thinking process. It’s consistently one of the most popular projects in the entrepreneurship curriculum—creative, fun, and full of invaluable teaching moments. Students love it, and it effectively bridges theory with hands-on experience.

After completing this exercise, your students will be able to define problems, iterate solutions, and design prototypes based on customer needs. It’s an excellent way to bring practical, hands-on learning into your entrepreneurship curriculum.


#2 Failure Resume

An infographic titled "My Failure Resume" with four sections: "My School Failures" (Kicked out of high school, Failed pre-calculus 2 times, Got denied at 5 Big Ten university PhD programs), "My Work Failures" (Denied tenure at Illinois State University), "My Sports, Clubs & Competition Failures" (Cut from the high school basketball team), and

Next up is the failure resume, this exercise is all about reframing failure as a learning opportunity.

Helping your students recognize the value of failure will enable them to make the most of the learning opportunities that follow. It’s a powerful way to build resilience and a growth mindset in your classroom.


#1 Pilot Your Purpose

An image with the header "Pilot Your Purpose" and festive balloons. The main text reads, "Congratulations! You just identified your purpose 🙌! Since your purpose includes your passions and the impact you can have on the world, use it to guide your exploration of entrepreneurship!" Below is a quote: "Entrepreneurship isn't about starting companies. It's about helping yourself help others." The footer notes

Finally, our favorite and most popular exercise is the Pilot Your Purpose exercise. This activity helps students define their purpose, uncover their passions, and drive their engagement.

When students discover what truly excites them, their enthusiasm for learning skyrockets. This exercise is a cornerstone of an effective entrepreneurship curriculum.


Want More?

If you enjoyed these exercises and are looking for more, you’re in luck! All of these engaging and innovative exercises are part of our online curriculum, ExEC.

Request a preview of ExEC today and see why it’s the only resource you’ll need for your entrepreneurship curriculum this semester.

By incorporating these exercises into your teaching, you’ll transform your classroom into an interactive, engaging environment where students are eager to learn and participate.

Say goodbye to blank stares and hello to a dynamic entrepreneurship curriculum!


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Missed Our Recent Articles?

Whether you are new to our community of entrepreneurship educators, or you’ve been contributing for years, we wanted to give you a list of the posts our community finds most valuable:

The Topics Your Entrepreneurship Curriculum Needs for The Fall 2024 Semester

The Topics Your Entrepreneurship Curriculum Needs for The Fall 2024 Semester

As an entrepreneurship educator, keeping your entrepreneurship curriculum current is crucial. Business and technology are rapidly evolving, and staying current is essential to keep your students engaged and informed.

If your entrepreneurship curriculum hasn’t been updated recently, it might be time for a refresh.

Here are some topics to consider adding to your curriculum to enhance student interaction and interest.

1. Expand on Social Entrepreneurship

Did you know that a recent study found that 9 in 10 college-age students are passionate about social causes?

Integrating a social entrepreneurship module into your traditional entrepreneurship curriculum can significantly boost student engagement.

Social entrepreneurship focuses on creating social value and addressing societal issues, which resonates with many students today.

To help you get started, we have prepared some slides that discuss the differences between traditional and social entrepreneurship.

These slides can form the basis of a compelling new module in your entrepreneurship curriculum.

Traditional entrepreneurship vs social entrepreneurship gif
Slide 1: Traditional vs Social Entrepreneurship

Table demonstrating the differences between traditional and social entrepreneurship
Slide 6: Key differences between traditional and social entrepreneurship

To further enhance this module, consider incorporating the “Pilot Your Purpose” exercise. This activity will not only engage a wide range of students but also provide them with a practical framework for pursuing their social entrepreneurial goals.

Pilot Your Purpose

 

To Summarize, Here’s how to Start Implementing Social Entrepreneurship Into Your Course:

  1. Get your Entrepreneurship Slides (see button above)
  2. Implement Pilot Your Purpose

 


Next up to keep your curriculum fresh in 2024 is a new way to approach case studies using AI to create more engagement.

2. Introduction to AI Case Studies

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is revolutionizing various industries, and understanding its applications is crucial for future entrepreneurs.

Teaching AI through case studies can make the subject more relatable and exciting for your students.

We suggest using the “Case Study Wheel of Fortune” to add an element of surprise and engagement.

While the prize might be presenting a case study, this method keeps students on their toes and encourages active participation.

Here’s how you can set it up:


All in All…

In the ever-changing landscape of entrepreneurship, continuous improvement and innovation in your entrepreneurship curriculum are vital.

For a comprehensive curriculum filled with engaging exercises and activities, consider exploring ExEC. It offers a wealth of resources designed to keep your entrepreneurship curriculum fresh and exciting.

Keeping your entrepreneurship curriculum up to date is not just beneficial for your students but also for you as an educator.

Engaged students are more likely to succeed and make meaningful contributions to their fields. Start by incorporating social entrepreneurship and AI case studies into your curriculum, and don’t hesitate to seek out additional resources to enhance your entrepreneurship curriculum.


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Missed Our Recent Articles?

Whether you are new to our community of entrepreneurship educators, or you’ve been contributing for years, we wanted to give you a list of the posts our community finds most valuable:

AI in Academia 2024 Summit

AI in Academia 2024 Summit


TeachingEntrepreneurship.org is excited to invite you to the AI in Academia 2024 Summit with… 

4 AI Workshops for Educators!

Invite your entire department because . . .

The AI in Academia Summit won’t be entrepreneurship-specific, so everyone is invited.
I.e. you’ll use what you learn to improve all your classes:
  • Increase student engagement 
  • Decrease your prep time
  • Combat AI plagiarism and 
  • Finally, reduce grading time 

Each session will run from 1:00 – 2:30 pm Eastern on their respective days but if you can’t join us live, recordings are available afterwards for purchase so you won’t have to miss out.

Register Here


Tuesday, May 7th

Speed Up Course Prep with AI

Next, you’ll learn how to use AI to create:

    ●  Syllabi 
    ● 
 Lesson plans &
      Finally assignments


Tuesday, May 14th

Creating Engaging Games with AI

Also, learn how AI can help you design interactive games so you can engage your students.


Tuesday, May 21st

Half Your Grading Time with a Virtual TA

Next, learn how to use AI to:

      Reduce your grading time
      Decrease student questions about grading
      Finally, Send students feedback more quickly and more consistently


Tuesday, May 28th

Create the Perfect Case Study with AI

Finally, discover how AI can help you develop and customize case studies for virtually any topic so you can rock the classroom.

Register Here


Early Bird Tickets Available

Additionally, we know budgets are tight right now so we’re offering a “Live Access Only” ticket free of charge.

Plus: Full Access tickets, which include recordings, slides, and a certificate of participation are another $100 off before April 30th. Because we want to share the knowledge with you and help you suceeed. 

 

Moreover, you can register here so you don’t miss the AI in Academia 2024 Summit!

Register Here

ChatGPT Prompts for Students: Part 1

ChatGPT Prompts for Students: Part 1

Student anxiety is skyrocketing around ChatGPT.

  • Can they use it?
  • Should they use it?
  • How do they use it?

The answer is yes, yes, and see the ChatGPT prompts for students below!

Entrepreneurship students spend their time consuming, curating and creating.

What if they could minimize the time investment and maximize the learning?

They can with these 5 ChatGPT prompts for students:

  • Get tutored
  • Get quizzed
  • Create a presentation
  • Debrief a team experience
  • Get a team coach

LAST CHANCE!

If you liked our Chatgpt prompts, check out our AI Interviewing Simulator or the How AI Thinks exercise for more engaging ways to up your students' AI game.


What's Next?

In upcoming posts, we will share exercises to engage your students.

Subscribe here to be the first to get these in your inbox.

Join 15,000+ instructors. Get new exercises via email!


Missed Our Recent Articles?

Whether you are new to our community of entrepreneurship educators, or you’ve been contributing for years, we wanted to give you a list of the posts our community finds most valuable:

  • Pilot Your Purpose. This exercise helps students discover what they’re passionate about and see how learning entrepreneurial skills can turn that passion into their purpose.
  • How to Improve Lesson Plans. Improve lesson plans by asking students how they feel, analyzing the data, implementing improvements, and compare the before data.
  • “The best class I’ve taken!”  We all want a Dead Poets Society moment in our entrepreneurship class. One professor using the Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum got hers!
Improved: Pilot Your Purpose v2

Improved: Pilot Your Purpose v2

Not every student dreams of becoming an entrepreneur but…
Every student yearns to find their purpose.

Regardless of their entrepreneurial ambitions, helping students define their purpose will give them a reason to learn entrepreneurial skills. Whether they want to help refugees find jobs or help student-athletes avoid injuries, helping students discover their passions is key to keeping them engaged.

What’s Your Purpose?

The original Pilot Your Purpose exercise is extremely popular with students because it helps them identify their interests, skills, passions, and desire for impact.

Teaching Entrepreneurship Pilot Your Purpose Exercise

After completing the exercise, students develop a purpose statement they can “pilot” throughout your course. As a result, your class becomes a way to pursue their purpose.

Integrating Purposeful AI 

Of course, for some students, introspection can be difficult. So we updated the exercise to leverage AI brainstorming prompts to help them discover passions they may not think of on their own:
ChatGPT prompt to help students generate ideas they may be passionate about
 
Note: if you or your students don’t have much experience with AI in the classroom, or you’d like to provide them a functional understanding of how it works, check out our Birds & Bees of Artificial Intelligence exercise.

Celebrate Their Purpose

Several more steps are outlined in the lesson plan below, but once students have identified a potential purpose, give them a chance to celebrate what excites them and have them create groups of 2 – 3 students and invite them to share with one another.

Pilot Your PurposeThen ask students to share their purpose with you by either:

  • Sharing their slide deck with you
  • Presenting their purpose to the class
  • Recording a video presenting and posting it on the class discussion board

Learning about what motivates your students will provide you with insight to help you address their needs, and will naturally increase engagement.

Connect it to Your Course

We use this exercise as the first lesson in our comprehensive entrepreneurship curriculum and strategically revisit it throughout the course. That helps make entrepreneurship skills personally relevant to students, regardless of their desire to “become an entrepreneur.”

By making your class about their purpose, whether or not they want to be entrepreneurs…

Your students have a reason to learn entrepreneurial skills.

Get the New “Pilot Your Purpose” Lesson Plan

We’ve created a detailed lesson plan for the “Pilot Your Purpose” exercise to walk you and your students through the process step-by-step.

Get the Lesson Plan

 

It’s free for any/all entrepreneurship teachers. Please feel free to share it.


Coming Soon…

We will be sharing more engaging exercises like this one!

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How AI Thinks: The Birds and Bees of AI Answers

How AI Thinks: The Birds and Bees of AI Answers

For your students to be able to take advantage of full AI . . .
Students need to understand how AI works.

Lesson Plan: Birds & Bees of AI

Watch the video above to learn how to teach students:
  • Where AI answers come from
  • The difference between Google search and ChatGPT
  • When to use AI and when to avoid it
You can also get the lesson plan and slides below.

Step 1: A brand new language for AI answers

Tell your students they are going to learn a brand new language the same way AI learns new things.

Show them a list of words and their job is to figure out

  • Which words refer to birds
  • Which words refers to cats and
  • Which words refer to neither

Present this list of words to your students and ask which ones are the bird words.

Birds and bees exercise to understand how AI learns a new language

You’ll sit in awkward silence and be met with blank stares.

After a few moments, acknowledge your students have no clue which ones are the bird words. Explain this is exactly how AI answers start out.

Everything these AIs learn they’ve had to be trained on.

Before your students can answer the “bird word” question, they need training data.

Give them some bird words and ask them to observe what’s happening in their brain as you show these bird words.

  • Show the first bird word in this new language: Briz.
  • Show the second bird word: Buitle.
  • Show the third bird word: Bast.

Ask your students what the last bird word is. Tell them to write it down but don’t say it out loud, that you will count them down and all of them can shout it at once.

Count down 3 . . . 2 . . . 1 . . . GO! and your students will likely all shout “BEOL!”

Exercise demonstrating how AIs identify patterns in wordsStep 2: AI answers through pattern recognition

Explain the way their brain works to identify an answer is the same way AI answers a question.

Your students started making connections and seeing patterns as soon as you showed them the second or third word. They could understand you were giving them the words that start with B.

Tell your students they recognized the pattern, which is exactly how we train AIs. 

Tell your students you’re moving on to the cat words, and same as with the bird words, you will show them a couple words and then you’ll count them down to tell you the last cat word.

Give them some cat words and ask them to observe what’s happening in their brain as you show these cat words.

  • Show the first cat word in this new language: Schluggat.
  • Show the second cat word: Fissat.

Count your students down to yell the third cat word 3 . . . 2 . . . 1 . . . GO! and your students will likely yell a variety of answers.

Many students will say “Lerat.”

This answer makes sense because it ends with “at” just like “cat” and the first two cat words.

This is incorrect, because they don’t take the time to think through all the patterns you’ve given them.

It turns out AIs can be overly aggressive in pattern matching just like students who pick Lerat.

Step 3: Training data for accurate AI answers

Use the following story to highlight that an AI is only as good as its training data. If the AI doesn’t have enough training data it can can make incorrect assumptions, and if it has biased or incorrect training data, it can produce erroneous results. The point to drive home is that training data is of utmost importance.

The story is about AI researchers who were trying to train AI to detect malignant moles from images. They used a lot of images of moles to train the AI, and the AI came up with an astounding conclusion:

Rulers cause cancer.

The AI learned that any picture with a ruler in it also contained a malignant mole. So it concluded that rulers caused cancer. What happened is the AI researchers trained the tool on a number of pictures of people’s benign moles that didn’t have rulers in them, but the malignant moles did have rulers in them to indicate the size of the mole.

The AI got overly aggressive and thought anytime it sees a ruler the mole must be cancerous.

Back to the cat words.

Tell students that Lorat is not the right cat word, and ask them to shout out what is the last cat word in 3 . . . 2 . . . 1 . . . and they will shout “WRATT!”

How AIs learn language

Highlight the pattern of double letters that ends with an “at” sound.

Tell students they now have all the information they need to be an AI after these two training exercises.

Step 4: A brand new word!

As a new AI, you want them to use the patterns they learned so far to generate a brand new word that means “flying cat.”

Turning students into AIs by training to recognize patterns

Give your students about 30 seconds, and tell them you’ll count down for them to shout their answer. Count them down from 3, and you’ll hear some words that start with “B” and have double letters and end with an “at” sound. 

This is what you want because they are using their training to combine the attributes of bird and cat words. Talk about some of the words they’re sharing and how they made incorrect assumptions and/or produced erroneous results. 

For instance, maybe a student says “bat.” It does start with a “b” and end with an “at” sound, but it doesn’t have any double letters.

Maybe another student says “bullet.” It does start with a “b” and have double letters, but it does not end with an “at” sound.

This is how generative AIs work – they learn some patterns and combine them.

Step 5: Google answers vs. AI answers

Explain to your students this is the difference between these new AIs and something like Google. Google is basically a dictionary. It is a database of gathered information from around the web. So when they ask Google for that information, it searches for information on websites and creates a database of them.

When you ask Google for a definition, it retrieves information about that word and gives it to you.

The difference between Google and generative AI like ChatGPT

Now explain the difference of generative AI answers.

ChatGPT works from information it’s gathered across the web, but it’s not a dictionary.

Tell your students to think of a generative AI like ChatGPT like an incredible Lego builder. The Legos are not individual facts, but are patterns it observed. The AI builds a database of these patterns, and uses those patterns to generate brand new content that has never before been created.

As new generative AIs, your students never saw a word that means “flying cat” but they do know:

  • Things that fly are birds, and bird words start with a “b”
  • A cat word needs to contain double letters and end with an “at” sound

Tell them to combine these patterns and generate a brand new word from them.

For fun, give students 30 seconds to create a new word by combining these patterns. As they share, have fun celebrating their ability to use pattern recognition to create something the world has never known before.

Get the “The Birds & Bees of AI” Lesson Plan

We’ve created a detailed lesson plan for the “The Birds & Bees of AI: Where Do Answers Come From?” exercise to walk you and your students through the process step-by-step.

Get the Lesson Plan

 

  It’s free for any/all entrepreneurship teachers. Please feel free to share it.

 


Coming Soon…

In upcoming posts, we will be sharing more engaging AI exercises like this one!

Subscribe here to get lesson plans delivered in your inbox.

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AI Interviewing Simulator

AI Interviewing Simulator

Students are reporting more social anxiety than ever.

But, this Fall, there’s a tool that can help…

New: AI Interviewing Simulator

Presently, the key to helping students feel more comfortable interviewing customers is obviously to practice.

So the new AI Interviewing Simulator is here to help students practice their interviewing skills as often as needed.

Here’s how it works:


Step 1: First, students describe a customer they want to interview…

Step 2: Then, they ask interview questions out loud…

Step 3: Next, the AI verbally responds to them…

(Bonus) Step 4: After asking all of their questions, the students get feedback on how how to improve their interviews…

Watch the Full AI Interviewing Simulator Demo

AI Interviewing Simulator for Entrepreneurship Educators


2 Ways Your Students Can Use the AI Interviewing Simulator

Option #1

Use the Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum

ExEC provides 30+ engaging lessons so you can use inside and outside your class.

Now ExEC includes the AI Interviewing Simulator, but at no additional charge.


Option #2

Use just the ExEC Customer Interviewing Module

Now, you can now integrate ExEC’s customer interviewing lessons into your course, but, without having to adopt the entire curriculum. You’ll get exercises to teach:

  • Who to interview
  • What to ask during an interview
  • How to analyze interviews
  • And finally, your students will get full access to the new AI Interview simulator

But all without you having to redesign your course.

Additionally, your students will get access to everything in ExEC, for life, and for less than the cost of a textbook.


Click Here to Chat About Either Option

Since so many students are experiencing social anxiety and are reluctant to talk to customers, we’re super excited about this new approach!


What’s Next?

Fianlly, in upcoming posts, we will share more engaging resources we are developing for entrepreneurship educators so you can transform your classrooms!

Subscribe here to be the first to get these resources delivered to your inbox!

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How to Improve Lesson Plans

How to Improve Lesson Plans

If you’d like to improve lesson plans . . .

Just ask your students how they feel.

The surprisingly simple details are below, but I can attest this process works (it’s the same one we use to improve the Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum).

Step 1: Ask Your Students How They Feel

At the end of each lesson or exercise, simply ask your students how they felt about it.

From our experience, surveying students about their feelings provides more actionable feedback than a question like “On a scale from 1 to 5 how would you rate…?”.

Here are the specific questions we students ask after every ExEC exercise:

improve lesson plan

We get better results by asking emotionally-based questions because:

  1. It’s easier for students to check boxes indicating their feelings than it is for them to score an exercise on an arbitrary number scale.
     
  2. We care as much about the “why” behind their rating as we do about the rating itself. From our experience, students provide more in-depth answers to why they have a feeling than why they gave something a numeric rating.

Step 2: Analyze the Data

Once your data comes back, patterns will emerge.

For example, this data from Fall 2021 shows how ExEC students felt after completing their first exercise:

While the majority of students felt excited and confident about the assignment, 18% of them felt confused, which provided an opportunity for improvement.

After reading why those students felt confused, we hypothesized adding a video that showed students how to turn their assignments in might reduce their confusion.

Step 3: Implement Improvements

In our case we created a video demonstrating how to submit ExEC assignments on each of the major LMSs (e.g. Canvas, Blackboard, Moodle, D2L).

In your case, you’ll implement solutions informed by your students’ surveys. After that, you can simply ask your students for their feedback again so you can . . .

Step 4: Compare the Before Data 

In our case, the impact of the new video was immediate. By Spring of 2022 . . .

We saw student confusion cut in half, while excitement and confidence continued to rise.

The best part is, you can use these four steps to improve just about anything related to your course.

Just ask these two questions:

  1. How did you feel doing this?
  2. Why that feeling?

And you can improve the quality of a specific lesson, a homework assignment, or the course overall. 


And now it’s your turn:

How did you feel about this article?

If you’d like to feel confident you’re using a curriculum that is continuously improving, check out the Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum.

We practice what we preach to ensure you and your students have the most engaging experiences possible.

Preview ExEC Now

Experiential Entrepreneurship Curriculum Logo


Teaching Entrepreneurship AI Summit

Register Now!

Coming Soon…

We will be sharing more engaging exercises like this one!

Subscribe here to get lesson plans delivered in your inbox.

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Business Plans vs Business Models/Canvases: Data from Entrepreneurship Classes

Business Plans vs Business Models/Canvases: Data from Entrepreneurship Classes

Why do many folks teach business plans?

From our research . . .

It’s not because they think the business plans are the best tool for building a business.

We asked the Teaching Entrepreneurship community what tools they teach and many of the instructors we surveyed teach business plans because it’s a course requirement or because they believe it’s “standard practice” outside academia.

Our research appears to contradict the notion that business plans are standard practice as a majority (57%) of instructors outside academia don’t teach business plans at all.

In fact, across the nearly 300 instructors we surveyed, only 8% teach the business plan exclusively.

Compare that to the 88% of instructors who teach one of the “canvases” (e.g. Business Model Canvas, Lean Canvas, and/or Value Proposition Canvas) and it’s clear business plans are no longer the de facto standard.

The most popular tools to teach entrepreneurship

Why Do Teachers Love the Business Plan?

The few respondents teaching only the business plan cited many reasons for preferring this tool. The most commons reasons are:

  • It is a comprehensive tool
  • It is necessary for some funding sources like bank loans
  • It is required by standards in the respondent’s particular context

But the vast majority of teachers don’t feel that way – across all teacher populations we surveyed (K-12 and higher ed, academic and non-academic, from the US and abroad), only 8% teach only the business plan

For instructors and course coordinators who still teach the business plan:

  • Requirements that business plans be taught because they are seen as a standard entrepreneurial practice should be reconsidered.
  • While some instructors see benefits in teaching business plans, and they may be important to teach in some circumstances, they are taught by a minority of instructors both inside and outside academia and should no longer be considered the de facto standard for describing businesses.

What Entrepreneurship Tools Do Teachers Use?

“Canvases” (Business Model Canvas, Lean Canvas, and/or Value Proposition Canvas) have replaced the business plan as the most popular teaching tool.

As we mentioned earlier, 88% of instructors we surveyed teach with some version of a Canvas, and 50% teach the Business Model Canvas. 

Why Do Teachers Love the Canvas?

Our respondents cited many reasons for preferring the Business Model Canvas. The most common reasons are:

  • It is simple and user friendly. Specifically, some teachers noted the BMC is a way to engage non-business students that is not intimidating.
  • It forces students to focus on customer development and experimentation as they pursue product-market fit.
  • It is the dominant tool used in “the real world.”

Because of the dominance of the BMC in entrepreneurship education, we engaged Dr. Alexander Osterwalder in a series of posts to share how he teaches this tool. 

How Do The Entrepreneurship Tools You Use Compare To Your Peers?

  • Nearly 80% of K-12 teachers reported using a canvas tool to teach entrepreneurship, while almost 50% reported using a business plan.
  • Nearly 90% of academic teachers reported using a canvas tool to teach entrepreneurship, while almost 50% reported using a business plan.
  • Nearly 90% of US-based teachers reported using a canvas tool to teach entrepreneurship, while almost 50% reported using a business plan.

Other Popular Entrepreneurship Education Tools

AI Tools

To see the full list of additional teaching tools, please enter your email below.

In future posts we will share more about our upcoming TeachingEntrepreneurship.org Summer Summit and about tools and methods to increase student engagement.

Subscribe here to get info delivered in your inbox.

Join 15,000+ instructors. Get new exercises via email!

 

Teaching Entrepreneurship AI Summit Summer 2023

Teaching Entrepreneurship AI Summit Summer 2023


The Teaching Entrepreneurship Summit is back with . . .

4 AI Workshops for Educators!

With new AI tools coming out every day, it’s hard to know which ones are useful for teaching.

In this special AI summit, you’ll:

  • Get up to speed on AI in education
  • Get several fun exercises to show your students the power of AI
  • Discover how to avoid AI plagiarism
  • Learn how AI can save you endless time (e.g. faster assessment)

Register Here


Learn Best Practices For Leveraging AI

The Teaching Entrepreneurship Summit will help you make the most of AI.

Register now so you don’t miss it!

Each session will run from 1:00 – 2:30 pm Eastern on their respective days but if you can’t join us live, recordings are available for purchase.


Tuesday, May 9th

AI Demystified: A Guide for Entrepreneurship Educators

Exercises to introduce your students (and yourself) to AI:

  • What are the best AI tools for entrepreneurship classes?
  • How can AI improve students’ business ideas?
  • How can AI make assessment faster?
  • How do you mitigate concerns about AI in the classroom?

Tuesday, May 16th

Using AI to Teach Customer Interviewing

The pandemic only exacerbated students’ customer interviewing anxiety.

In this session you’ll learn AI-powered exercises to help your students:

  • Find the right customers to interview
  • Learn the best questions to ask
  • Practice customer interviews with an AI “chat coach”

. . . all of which will build their interviewing confidence!


Tuesday, May 23rd

Teaching AI-Enabled Financial Modeling

Blow your students’ minds when you show them how easy it is to make robust financial models with the help of AI.

During this workshop you’ll get exercises to help your students:

  • Understand financial concepts
  • Develop accurate financial models
  • Learn how to validate those models in the real world

Tuesday, May 30th

AI Tools to Build Better MVPs 

Your students will be able to test demand for their products and services faster than ever with AI tools to help them:

  • Launch professional MVPs in minutes (no coding required)
  • Write amazing marketing copy
  • Generate powerful imagery for their MVPs, ads, and videos (no design experience required)

Register Here


Early Bird Tickets Available

We know budgets are tight right now so we’re offering a “Live Access Only” ticket free of charge.

Plus: Full Access tickets, which include recordings, slides, and a certificate of participation are $100 off before April 28th.

BONUS: We’re a team of experienced engineers, educators, and entrepreneurs with decades of combined experience. We know AI can be intimidating, so we’ve done the work sifting through what’s out there and what’s worth it.

Exclusive to Full Access ticket holders, join us for an “Ask Us Anything” session where we’ll help you tackle any challenge you have in your entrepreneurship class – AI-related or otherwise.

Register here so you don’t miss the AI Summer 2023 Summit!

Register Here